Timeline for

Broadcasting

>>In this module we'll summarize the history of broadcasting in terms of dates and major events.

1871-73

The door to electromagnetism, the foundation of all of broadcasting, is opened by the theories of Michael Faraday and James Clerk-Maxwell.

1884

Paul Nipkow devises a scanning disc television system.

1886

Henrich Hertz experiments with electromagnetic waves.

1892-94

Voice audio are transduced into electrical energy by Nathan Stubbelfield; Marconi transmits electromagnetic waves, the precursor of radio.

1901

Guglielmo Marconi sends a transoceanic radio signal from England to Signal Hill, Newfoundland. In the same year, Marconi patents a selective tuning device for receivers.

1904-06

J. Ambrose Fleming patents the Fleming vacuum tube "valve"; Lee deForest builds on the concept and introduces the audion amplifier tube .

1906

H.C. Dunwoody invents crystal radio receiver. In the same year, 27 nations adopt wireless (radio) regulations at International Radiotelegraph Conference.

1910

The U.S. issues the Wireless Ship Act.

1912

Radio becomes a household name when it's used to aid rescue efforts as the Titanic, the "unsinkable" luxury cruise liner, sinks. The Radio Act of 1912 goes into effect.

1914-18

Radio is extensively used to aid World War I effort.

1919-20

9XM radio (later WHA) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, signs on. KDKA in Pittsburgh, PA is licensed and begins regular programming .

1922

"Toll" (commercial) broadcasting starts at WEAF, in New York.

1923

V. K. Zworkin patents the iconoscope TV imaging tube .

1927

U.S. Radio Act of 1927 is signed forming the Federal Radio Commission.

1930

Philo T. Farnsworth receives a patent for television .

1933

Closed-circuit TV educational television starts at State University of Iowa .

1933

Edwin Armstrong demonstrates FM radio.

1934

As part off the Communications Act of 1934, the Federal Communications Commission is formed to govern U.S. broadcasting .

1939

Television is introduced at the U.S. World's Fair .

1942

FCC authorizes 525-line, black and white TV in U.S.

1947

The transistor is invented at Bell Laboratories leading to small, efficient electronic circuits .

1948

Cable TV (CATV) is introduced in Pennsylvania and Oregon.

1953

KUHT becomes first educational TV station.

1953


FCC approves RCA's color TV system and rescinds a 1950 decision on the CBS color system
.

1956

Ampex demonstrates the first practical videotape recorder in Redwood City, CA .

1963

The Telstar satellite relays live TV pictures across the Atlantic.

1977

Fiber optic technology introduced that greatly expands point-to-point audio and video transmissions .

1983

Direct satellite broadcasts to homes begin.

1984

FCC approves TV stereo system .

1993

FCC expands AM radio band to allow more stations

1995

Internet radio and TV start .

1996

Telecommunications bill deregulates license renewal and station ownership.

1999


Digital (including wide-screen HDTV) television broadcasting starts in the U.S.

2006
More than 1,000 U.S. digital TV stations are on the air and television enjoys it's first major technological change in decades. Consumers start buying HDTV sets in significant numbers.
2009 Broadcast TV in the U.S. goes all-digital; most analog TV transmitters are shut down.
2010 3-D TV sets go on sale in the U.S, possibly opening a new era in TV programming.

 

>>In the next Mass Media module we'll conclude this topic with sections on careers in broadcasting.


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